UK commentator deems Google’s new privacy policy legally questionable.

Simon Davies, a visiting senior fellow in the London School of Economics and director of Privacy International, recently published in The Guardian a discussion of Google’s brand new privacy policy – a policy that, according to Davies, “puts customer surveillance at the core of the company’s interest.” Davies considers it “one of the most deceptive, provocative and possibly unlawful documents [Google] has ever produced.” The new policy is a single and simplified privacy policy to cover the information practices of every element of Google’s operations, from search and advertising to mobile products and social networking. However, Davies writes, “Sadly, this privacy policy is the last place you should look for an understanding of how Google uses your information. The new policy might be more straightforward, but it is also worthless to anyone wanting to know exactly what this behemoth does with personal data. Even worse, it is a simplistic, cynical and legally questionable device which could encroach even further into personal privacy.”

Category: Privacy / La vie privée

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